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  • in reply to: Re: C2022 too big for a single character #3192
    prasanna
    Participant

    Hello
     
    The problem with your code is that you can not have lengthy unicode string. You have to split it up in parts like..
    If you have a string defined as follows, it generates C2026:

    char sz[] ="imagine a really, really long string here";

    You could break it up as follows:

    char sz[] ="imagine a really, really long string here";

     
    So you try it like ….

    if ( theApp.m_bRTL ) strText = _T('x''20''2B') + strText;

    May be it can resolve your problem.

    in reply to: what is integrators in c++(waiting reply) #3187
    prasanna
    Participant

    When I searched the web for Integrators in C++ I found this class that solves differential equations using the adaptive stepsize Runge-Kutta integrators.
    And here is the link to that class. http://www.ddj.com/184409680
    See if it helpyou out…

    in reply to: difference between getchar(), getch(), and getc() #3106
    prasanna
    Participant

    If you open the Torbo C++ Compiler help it will give you the following details about these functions.
    getchar is a macro defined as getc(stdin) getchar returns the next character on the input stream stdin.
    Return Value:
    On success
    – getchar returns the character read, after converting it to an int without sign extension.
    On error (and on end-of-file for getchar), both macros return EOF.

    getc returns the next character on the given input stream and increments the stream’s file pointer to point to the next character.
    Return Value:
    On success
    – getc returns the character read, after converting it to an int without sign extension.
    On error (and on end-of-file for getc), both functions return EOF.

    I hope you can now wel understand this.

     

    in reply to: Smart pointers… #3112
    prasanna
    Participant

    To generalize the type universe of smart pointers, we distinguish three potentially distinct types in a smart pointer:

    The storage type. This is the type of pointee_. By “default”—in regular smart pointers—it is a raw pointer.

    The pointer type. This is the type returned by operator->. It can be different from the storage type if you want to return a proxy object instead of just a pointer. (You will find an example of using proxy objects later in this chapter.)

    The reference type. This is the type returned by operator*.

    It would be useful if SmartPtr supported this generalization in a flexible way. Thus, the three types mentioned here ought to be abstracted in a policy called Storage.

    In conclusion, smart pointers can, and should, generalize their pointee type. To do this, SmartPtr abstracts three types in a Storage policy: the stored type, the pointer type, and the reference type. Not all types necessarily make sense for a given SmartPtr instantiation. Therefore, in rare cases (handles), a policy might disable access to operator-> or operator* or both.

    in reply to: Top 10 Reasons to Adopt Visual C# #3129
    prasanna
    Participant

    Wel I as a C Language developer then i tend towords JAVA, I love to program in JAVA.

    By seeing these C# qualities I am planning to get a bit know how of this language.

    I will also advise new guys who are in C/C++ goto this language.

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